What are Your Chances of Having Twins if you take Clomid?

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1. Clomid and Twins

Clomid is a fertility drug with quite the reputation. Besides being one of the most commonly prescribed and widely successful fertility drugs on the market, Clomid has a reputation for being a twin baby making miracle drug. However, some of those reports have been widely embellished and there are many myths out there that exist regarding Clomid and the chance of having twins with Clomid. Read on for more info about the real chances of having Clomid twins.

Clomid has a reputation for being a twin baby making miracle drug

2 Why Clomid Increases Twin Chances

Clomid increases a woman’s chance of having twins because it helps the body produce extra hormones in order to grow and mature the follicles for ovulation. This increases the estrogen levels in the body. Because of these things, a woman might have so much extra stimulation and nourishment for her reproductive system, that the body is “tricked” into producing more than one egg. When that occurs, and the two eggs (or sometimes more!) are released during ovulation and fertilized, the result is twins.

Clomid increases a woman’s chance of having twins because it helps the body produce extra hormones

3 How Common Are Clomid Twins?

If you rely soley on the media and internet message boards, you might think that almost every woman who takes Clomid will get pregnant with twins. However, that is simply not the case. In actuality, taking Clomid doesn’t really increase a woman’s chances of having twins all that much.

taking Clomid doesn’t really increase a woman’s chances of having twins

You see, a woman has a 1-3% chance of having twins naturally. When taking Clomid, that chance of having twins jumps to around 8 percent. So, as you can see, taking Clomid really doesn’t boost your chance of having twins that much, but it does give it a little bit of a boost.

4 What To Know About Clomid Twins

Another important thing to remember about Clomid twins is that they will not usually be identical twins. Eighty percent of twins conceived while on Clomid are fraternal twins, and the other twenty percent are identical twins.

Eighty percent of twins conceived while on Clomid are fraternal twins

Fraternal twins are more common while taking Clomid because Clomid allows your body to produce more than one egg, which is how fraternal twins are formed. If the twins came from one single egg, they would be identical. Women who have a family history of fraternal twins, will of course be more likely to conceive twins on Clomid than other women.

Also, women who are on a higher dose of Clomid, are obese, or are over age 45 will have a greater chance of conceiving twins. If you have additional questions about Clomid and twins, make sure to talk to your doctor.

What are Your Chances of Having Twins if you take Clomid?, 5.0 out of 5 based on 1 rating
Dr. Karen Leham is double board-certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and in Reproductive Endocronology and Infertility. Dr. Leham completed her residency at Loyola University, followed by a fellowship at UCLA.
  • Nikkiewalters

    When I became pregnant with my first child i took so many tests to make sure I was reading it correctly. I was thankful the blood test at the time I was not sure how far along I was without that test we would have been way off on my due date. ;) 

  • Joni_g24

    I have taken multiple early result home pregnancy tests starting about 8 days post ovulation. The first two were very clearly negative. Then came several tests showing a faint positive. Each day after ovulation, the positive line seems to be a tiny bit darker. My breasts are sore, feel heavy and I am slightly nauseated upon rising. I even did a quant hcg about 3 weeks after lmp. Revealing a level of 7 ( which is what ga table said was a normal reading). The qualitative blood test was “inconclusive”. However, the digital hpt yell a big fat “no”. I am 36 years old and am Starting to think this isn’t a true pregnancy or at least a viable one. Have any insight for this very impatient mom?
    Thanks so much!

    • Dr. Christine Lee, MD

      If your results have been inconclusive and you are experiencing some symptoms, I believe consulting your doctor is your next best option. Your doctor might need to have you undergo some more tests to determine your condition, after which you could discuss about the options you have for your personal care and health.